Month: January 2018

General, News, Parish Council

Annual Parish Meeting of Clifton upon Dunsmore


All parishes, whether or not they have a parish council, hold a meeting once a year to discuss the affairs of the parish. It is an opportunity for the Parish Council to report on its activities during the year, for borough and county councillors and village organisations to make presentations, and for villagers to raise any concerns they may have.

The annual parish meeting is not a parish council meeting; however, the Chair of the Parish Council should preside if he/she is available to attend. The Clerk to the Parish Council is responsible for the minutes of the meeting. As it is not a Parish Council meeting, no resolutions can be passed by the Parish Council, however a vote may be taken amongst those electors of the parish present on a motion laid before the meeting.

This year invitations have been issued to the local Police Beat Team, the Fire and Rescue Service (Safe and Well at Home service) and Community Safety Wardens to attend from 7.00pm to provide information on their services and to enable residents to talk directly to them.

Representatives of local groups and organisations are most welcome to come along to the meeting to provide information about their activities during the past year; their information will be then recorded in the minutes and included on the community pages of the Parish Council website, which will hopefully encourage more people to participate over the forthcoming year.

If your group would like to give a presentation at the Annual Parish Meeting please let The Clerk know at least 10 days before the meeting (by 16 March) to enable this to be included on the Agenda.

If possible please also provide the Clerk with a copy of your presentation on  to ensure that it is recorded accurately.

General, News, Rugby Borough, Uncategorized

Cream of contemporary crafts at Rugby Art Gallery and Museum

Ghost Horses and Guns by Melanie Tomlinson

Ghost Horses and Guns by Melanie Tomlinson

MADE in the Middle, an exhibition of contemporary crafts, opens at Rugby Art Gallery and Museum this weekend.

Craftspace’s recurring, touring exhibition of contemporary craft and applied art from the Midlands visits the Little Elborow Street venue from Saturday (20 January).

The eighth in the series, Made in the Middle provides a great opportunity to purchase and commission work from some of the best makers in the Midlands.

Developed in partnership with Coventry’s Herbert Art Gallery and Museum, this Made in the Middle exhibition forms part of Craftspace’s 30th anniversary programme.

Featuring both recent graduates and makers with established reputations, visitors can explore a wealth of creativity, including ceramics, jewellery, metalwork and textiles.

Selected by an expert panel through open entry, 28 makers offer an insight into the skill, creativity and innovative practice within the Midlands.

Exhibitors include jeweller Dauvit Alexander, who creates striking jewellery from found materials and precious gemstones, and Aimee Bollu, who also takes inspiration from found items which she combines with beautiful, minimal ceramic vessels.

John Grayson uses traditional metal forming and enamel decorating processes to create whimsical, humorous and decorative metal objects, while Karina Thompson pushes the boundaries of digital embroidery.

Made in the Middle runs at Rugby Art Gallery and Museum from Saturday 20 January to Saturday 10 March.

A preview takes place from 6pm to 8pm on Friday (19 January), where visitors can meet some of the artists who have contributed works to the exhibition.

Cllr Heather Timms, Rugby Borough Council portfolio holder for growth and investment, said: “Rugby Art Gallery and Museum has a rich and varied programme for 2018 and we’re delighted to welcome Craftspace’s celebration of contemporary craft in the Midlands to start the year.”

For more information on exhibitions and events at Rugby Art Gallery and Museum, visit

A new website celebrating 30 years of Made in the Middle has recently launched at

The online exhibition features 30 makers from almost 250 who have exhibited during the 30 year history of the exhibition and draws on the wealth of resources created to tell the story of Made in the Middle from 1988 to the present.

Made in the Middle is a partnership between Craftspace and the Herbert Art Gallery and Museum in collaboration with The National Centre for Craft and Design.

by Melanie Tomlinson

by Melanie Tomlinson

Community Safety, News

Police Warn of Ongoing Phone Scam

small-warwickshire (1)The police take phone scams very seriously. Criminals will often use scam phone calls as a way of defrauding people out of their money. On most occasions, people realise that the call is a scam, but we are encouraging people to continue be vigilant.

What to look out for:

Typically scammers will pretend to be from the police, and tell callers that their bank cards have been used fraudulently. Often the callers have stated that they are from the MET police, but they have been known to claim that they are from West Mercia Police, MI6 or the fraud squad. They will often say that they have the offenders in custody.

Usually they will then ask the victim to contact their bank to cancel their cards. In doing so, they will ‘hold the line’, so the victim believes that they are calling their bank, when in fact they are still on the line to the offenders.

They will then encourage the victims to hand over their bank details, including their PIN which they will often ask them to enter into the keypad of the phone.

Following this they will say that the cards are needed and send a courier to collect them. Sometimes they will ask the victims to give a password which the courier will use to make it appear more genuine. Consequently the offenders have been able to withdraw money from victim’s accounts.

On other occasions, rather than sending a courier, they have asked the victims to transfer money to a secure police account, asking them to call back to verify that they are genuine, whilst holding the line.

Sometimes the scammers have told the victims to attend the bank to transfer money but told them that bank employees are involved in the scam, so not to mention it to them.

More recently callers have told victims that they are from Customs and Excise and that they have paid too much tax. In order to get this back they must pay an amount of money via a courier.

These scammers will often target those who are elderly or vulnerable. People with common surnames such as Jones or Smith tend to be targeted more often.

What to do:

We offer the following advice to protect you from these scams:

  • Remember police officers, and banks will never ask for account details or PINs over the phone.
  • Police officers and banks would never come to your house to collect your cards or property.
  • They would also never ask you to transfer money to a secure account.
  • If you receive a call like this, hang up immediately and call 101 using another phone. In an emergency or if a crime is in progress call 999.
  • If you have elderly friends or relatives who may be vulnerable to this scam, please talk to them and make them aware.